Easy Double Crochet Border for Beginners – Tutorial and Video

Learn how to add an easy double crochet border to your baby blankets and more. This photo and video tutorial is beginner-friendly.

Today, you’ll learn how to finish your projects with an easy double crochet border. Borders are awesome because you can smooth out wiggly edges, hide ends, and add a professional finish to your crochet project. This double crochet edging can be added to anything, including blankets and dishcloths. It can be used on its own, or as a base for a more complicated edging like the zig-zag bobble border.

Want to learn more stitches and techniques? Browse the rest of our stitch tutorials.

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What is a double crochet border?

A double crochet border is an edging made entirely of double crochet stitches. It’s similar to a classic single crochet border (like the one I used on my Berry Cabled Dishcloth and Carrot Stitch Washcloth, and as a base on my Bobble Stripe Baby Blanket). However, it will be about twice as tall as the single crochet border.

You can use this easy double crochet border by itself or in combination with other stitches and edgings. This cutie from Daisy Farm Crafts utilizes double crochet post-stitches (fpdc/bpdc) to get a ribbed look.

Since there’s only one stitch, the dc edging can be added to any crochet project without the need for math or stitch multiples. It’s a super easy, beginner-friendly border.

slotted wooden spoon laying on two blue crochet dishcloths with double crochet borders in contrasting colors

Supplies / Materials

You can use any yarn and any matching hook for your border. It’s recommended that you use the same yarn and hook size you used for the body of your project, so the double crochet border has a similar gauge.

For the tutorial and photos, I used:

You could whip up a quick swatch to practice crocheting this border, or add a finishing touch to an existing project (like a baby blanket or afghan).

Techniques / Abbreviations

This tutorial utilizes US crochet terminology.

How to Crochet a Double Crochet Border

Before we get started crocheting our border, there are a couple rules to keep in mind.

  1. If you’re working on the top or bottom of your project, crochet one dc in every st, regardless of the type of stitch.
  2. If you’re working on the sides of your project, crochet:
    • 1 dc in every single crochet (sc) row
    • 3 dc across every two half double crochet (hdc) rows
    • 2 dc in every double crochet (dc) row
    • 3 dc in every treble/triple crochet (trc) row
    • and so on…
  3. Round 1 (if your project is dc): If you’re at a corner, crochet 5 dc around the post of the corner dc
  4. Rounds 2+ (or all rounds if your project is sc): If you’re at a corner, crochet 3 dc in the corner st
  5. When crocheting on the sides of your project, insert your hook between the first and second sts in the row and crochet around the whole stitch (not inside the stitch).

This last one isn’t quite a rule, but it’s a tip that’ll help keep your border edges clean.

Double Crochet Border Video Tutorial

Here’s a YouTube video tutorial to help you learn how to make a double crochet border. If you’re left-handed, click here for the flipped video.

Photo Tutorial

a. Before you finish the last st of the body (blanket, dishcloth, etc.), yo and finish the stitch with the border color. Skip this step if you’re using the same color. Rotate your work 45 degrees to the right (if you’re right-handed). The “right side” of your border is now facing you.

b. ch 2 (counts as dc) and dc along the side of your work, working all the way around the post of each st. Since my swatch is made of dc stitches, I put two border dc sts into each side dc. If your project uses a different stitch, crochet:

  • 1 dc in every single crochet (sc) row
  • 3 dc across every two half double crochet (hdc) rows
  • 2 dc in every double crochet (dc) row
  • 3 dc in every treble/triple crochet (trc) row
  • and so on…

c. When you get to the corner, crochet 5 dc around the post of the corner dc. Turn to begin crocheting along the bottom of your project. Skip the first st in the bottom as it’s already part of the corner. NOTE: if your project is single crochet, just crochet 3 dc into each corner.

d. dc into every st along the bottom of your project. When you get to the corner, you can either:

  • skip the last st and crochet 5 dc into the corner -or-
  • dc in the last st and crochet 4 dc into the corner
labeled step-by-step image collage depicting the first four steps to add a double crochet border

e. Next, turn to crochet down the side, following the same technique as step b. When you get to the corner, crochet 5 dc into the corner (if the project is dc). Turn to begin crocheting along the top.

f. skip the first st and dc along the top, putting one dc in every st.

g. When you reach the final corner, dc three more around the st (for a total of 5 dc). If you’re done with the border, trim yarn and join with an invisible join. Weave in ends. If you’re not done, join to first st with a slip stitch and either ch 2 to begin another round of the dc border, or follow the instructions for your next border.

NOTE: for future rounds of the dc border, you’ll only need to crochet three dc into each corner, as you won’t have to crochet along the sides of any stitches.

labeled step-by-step image collage depicting the last three steps to add a double crochet border

Frequently Asked Questions

Is the double crochet border for beginners?

Absolutely, yes! If you can know the double crochet stitch, you can add this dc border to your crochet project.

Can you put this double crochet border on a blanket?

Yep! I used two rounds of this dc border on the striped blanket in the photos below. You can use this technique to add a border to any square or rectangular crochet project, including baby blankets, dishcloths, placemats, etc. How do you double crochet a border on a blanket? Just follow the same principles described above and you’ll be good to go!

two images of a striped blanket on a dark teal background. white text overlay reads, "easy double crochet border - youshouldcraft.com"

How to crochet the double crochet border corners?

If your project uses single or half-double crochet, just dc three into each corner. If your project is double crochet, the first round will be a little bit different. Crochet five dc stitches around the post of each corner double crochet. Once you have an established border (rounds 2+), you can continue by crocheting three double crochet stitches in each corner. See the instructions above for more information and pictures.

How do you end a double crochet border?

I’m a huge fan of the invisible join technique, which creates a new “V” on top of an existing stitch. This makes your join seamless. I used the invisible join technique in the video tutorial, or Heart Hook Home has a photo tutorial.

Can you use the double crochet border to hide ends?

YESSS and this is one of the absolute best things about adding crochet borders or edging to a project. Weaving in ends is one of the most hated parts of crocheting, especially if you’re working on something with a lot of stripes or color changes. Adding a border gives you an easy place to put your ends and gives you a head start on the weaving.

Why is my double crochet border curling?

If your border starts to curl, you either have too few or too many stitches. If it starts to curl up (like a bowl), then you have too few stitches. Double check to make sure you put the right amount in each corner (3-5 dc) and along the sides (1 dc in each sc row, 3 dc across every two hdc rows, 2 dc in each dc row…). You might have missed some stitches.

If your border starts to ruffle, then you have too many stitches.

Can you crochet this double crochet border around a granny square?

Yes, but it’ll be even easier! Granny squares are crocheted in the round, so you’ll already have stitches to work into on every side. Just double crochet into the ch-sp (chain space) or top of each stitch around your granny square. In the corners, you can either crochet three dc, or follow what the granny square pattern had you do for corners (e.g. *dc, ch 2, dc*).

woman's hand on two blue dishcloths. white text overlay on a navy background reads, "stitch tutorial - easy double crochet border - www.youshouldcraft.com"


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